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Positieflijst voor gezelschapsdieren > Linkedin Animal Rights World Wide
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Ieder van uit zich zelf voor het geheel : Linkedin Dierenwelzijn Nederland, 50 groepen, 85.000 groepsleden.
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Linkedin Dierenwelzijn & Dierenbescherming   ·   Linkedin DierenPolitie   ·   Linkedin Animal Welfare Europe   ·   Linkedin World Animal Protection NL   ·   Linkedin Animal Activists International   ·   Linkedin Petitions & Causes   ·   Linkedin Animal Rights World Wide   ·   Linkedin Say NO to animal cruelty !   ·   Linkedin Burgerinitiatieven & Petities   ·   LDN ICT Informatie Communicatie & Techniek   ·   Linkedin Sea Shepherd International   ·   Linkedin AAP   ·   Linkedin Jane Goodall Instituut NL   ·   Linkedin Eyes on Animals   ·   Linkedin CAS International   ·   Linkedin IFAW NL   ·   Linkedin SPOTS bescherming bedreigde katachtigen   ·   Linkedin Paard   ·   Linkedin Vrienden van de Olifant   ·   Linkedin Dierenwelzijnsweb   ·   Linkedin DierenLot   ·   Linkedin Sea Shepherd NL   ·   Linkedin Compassion in World Farming NL   ·   Linkedin ProefdierVrij   ·   Linkedin Sophia-Vereeniging   ·   Linkedin DierenAmbulance   ·   Linkedin Bont voor Dieren   ·   Linkedin Lenie 't Hart Zeehondenfonds   ·   Linkedin Vegetariersbond   ·   Linkedin Vee Industrie   ·   Linkedin SAFP Stray Animal Foundation Platform   ·   Linkedin AMCF Animal Medical Care Foundation   ·   Linkedin ISAT - International Stray Animal Team   ·   Linkedin DOG International   ·   Linkedin Hond   ·   Linkedin CAT International   ·   Linkedin Kat   ·   Linkedin Nederland Zwerfkatarm 2025   ·   Linkedin PiepVandaag.nl   ·   Linked NFDO Nederlandse Federatie Dierenopvang Organisaties   ·   Linkedin Faunabescherming   ·   Linkedin Wilde Dieren de Tent Uit   ·   Linkedin Stichting Melief   ·   Linkedin Dutch Cell Dogs   ·   Linkedin Inbeslaggenomen Honden   ·   Linkedin Vissenbescherming   ·   Linkedin Waarborgfonds Quidem Carus   ·   Linkedin Dier, Natuur & Milieu   ·   LDN Moderator   ·   LDN Bestuur
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Animal rights is the idea that some, or all, non-human animals are entitled to the possession of their own lives and that their most basic interests—such as the need to avoid suffering—should be afforded the same consideration as similar interests of human beings. Advocates oppose the assignment of moral value and fundamental protections on the basis of species membership alone—an idea known since 1970 as speciesism, when the term was coined by Richard D. Ryder—arguing that it is a prejudice as irrational as any other. They maintain that animals should no longer be viewed as property or used as food, clothing, research subjects, entertainment, or beasts of burden.

Advocates approach the issue from a variety of perspectives. The abolitionist view is that animals have moral rights, which the pursuit of incremental reform may undermine by encouraging human beings to feel comfortable with using them. Gary Francione's abolitionist position promotes ethical veganism. He argues that animal rights groups that pursue welfare concerns, such as People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), risk making the public feel comfortable about its use of animals. He calls such groups "the new welfarists." PETA argues that Francione's criticism does little to help alleviate the suffering of individual animals and also trivializes the efforts of workers in the field who handle cruelty cases. It also creates divisiveness within the animal liberation movement instead of focusing on shared goals. Tom Regan, as a deontologist, argues that at least some animals are "subjects-of-a-life", with beliefs, desires, memories, and a sense of their own future, who must be treated as ends in themselves, not as means to an end. Sentiocentrism is the theory that sentient individuals are the subject of moral concern and therefore are deserving of rights. Protectionists seek incremental reform in how animals are treated, with a view to ending animal use entirely, or almost entirely. This position is represented by the philosopher Peter Singer. As a preference utilitarian, Singer's focus is not on moral rights, but on the argument that animals have interests—particularly an interest in not suffering—and that there is no moral or logical reason not to award those interests equal consideration. Multiple cultural traditions around the world—such as Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism—also espouse some forms of animal rights.

Critics of animal rights argue that animals are unable to enter into a social contract, and thus cannot be possessors of rights, a view summed up by the philosopher Roger Scruton, who writes that only humans have duties, and therefore only humans have rights. A parallel argument, known as the utilitarian position, is that animals may be used as resources so long as there is no unnecessary suffering; they may have some moral standing, but they are inferior in status to human beings, and insofar as they have interests, those interests may be overridden, though what counts as necessary suffering or a legitimate sacrifice of interests varies considerably.
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Linkedin Animal Rights World Wide
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